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October 23, 2015
Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
Michigan State University

View a Save the Date flyer here.

Research Symposium Schedule

Time

Events

8:00 – 8:30

Registration and Continental Breakfast (Lobby)

8:30 – 9:30

Plenary #1: Dr. Arup SenGupta (Auditorium)

"Technology Benefiting Humanity: Transforming Global Arsenic and Fluoride Crisis into an Economic Opportunity"

9:30-9:45

Coffee break (Room 104)

 

Session 1A - Agriculture

(Room 104)

click here for abstracts

Session 2A - Water Research

(Room 105)

click here for abstracts

9:45 – 10:00

Ebenezer Ansah (Africa)

"Nature and Extent of Farmer Participation in Cocoa Certification in Ghana"

Christopher Crock (Asia)

"High through-put dechlorination of TCE through Pd/xGnP and Pd-Au/xGnP hollow fiber nanocomposite membranes"

10:00 – 10:15

Udita Sanga (Asia)

"Increasing resiliency of farmers through stress tolerant maize varieties in semi-arid Gujarat, India: Lessons from the past and strategies for the future"

 

Ellis Adams (Africa)

"Does Decentralized Community-Based Water Governance Improve Access to Potable water in Peri-Urban and Informal Settlements? Evidence from Malawi "

10:15 – 10:30

Brad Peter (Africa)

"Field Verifying an Agricultural Production Model of Malawi Developed Using Satellite Imagery"

Emily Tummons (Asia)

" Collaboration with Singapore leads to a better understanding of the filtration of oily wastewater"

10:30 – 10:55

Lightning Round I (Room 104)

click here for abstracts

Timothy Silberg:"African Smallholder Weed Technologies for Intensified Grain Systems: A Review of their Actors and Outcomes"

Tridip Das: "Computational Studies of Strain Engineered Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite Thin Film Oxygen Surface Exchange Coefficients"

Matthew Flood: "Understanding Nutrient Impacts and Sources at the Watershed Scale Using Microbial Source Tracking (MST) to Enhance Environmental Stewardship"

Kristen Lynch: "Motivations for water conservation behaviors in water abundant areas: Qualitative interviews among key decision-makers"

 

Session 1B - Climate Change

(Room 104)

click here for abstracts

Session 2B - Fisheries & Wildlife

(Room 105)

click here for abstracts

10:55 – 11:10

Regis Nisengwe (Africa)

"Farmers' Climate Risk Perceptions in Nyabihu District"

Remington Moll (Africa)

"Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores"

11:10– 11:25

Maura Allaire (Asia)

"Informing mitigation of disaster loss through social media: evidence from Thailand"

Mykala Ford (Asia)

"Transboundary Fishing Conflict in the Palk Strait: Economic and Ecological Sustainability Implications"

11:25 -11:40

Mauricio Bustamante (Latin America)

"Clean Energy Production in Rural Central America Using On-site Solar-Biopower Generation"

Cadi Fung (Latin America)

"The Role of Perception and Representation in Human-Boto Relationships in the Brazilian Amazon"

11:45 – noon

Transition to lunch

noon – 1:30

Keynote: Dr. DeAndra Beck

"Navigating the Funding Maze: Strategies to Fund International Research Collaboration"

Lunch (Lincoln Room)

1:30 – 2:00

Poster session (Lincoln Room)

click here for abstracts

Hafsa Khan: "Domicology: Human Structural Abandonment"

Sayli Bote: "Biobased polyols from protein biomass residues for polyurethane (PU) applications"

Fariborz Daneshvar: "Climate change impact on macroinvertebrate communities in the Flint River Watershed"

Mahlet Garadew: "Lignin to Liquid Fules and Value-added Products using Thermochemical Conversion"

Pouyan Hatami: "Assessment of Reliability of Mishandling in Wastewater Treatment Plants self-reported Discharge Data Detected by Benford's Law"

Anthony Van Witsen: "Proposal for a content analysis of water attitudes in two media markets"

Preetam Giri: "Toughening of polylactide by block copolymerisation through reactive extrusion"

Shujun Ou: "Pre-differentiation may have driven the temperature adaptation of rice"

 

Session 3 - Africa

Room 104

click here for abstracts

Session 4 - Latin America and Asia

Room 105

click here for abstracts

2:00 – 2:15

Lin Liu (Agriculture)

"Agriculture land productivity and evaluations of pigeonpea effect on maize yield in Malawi"

Aniseh Bro (Agriculture)

"Determinants of Adoption of Sustainable Coffee Production Practices and Technologies in Nicaragua"

2:15 – 2:30

Tula Ngasala (Water)

"Water quality improvement through the implementation of sustainable sanitation solutions in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania"

Sara Torres (Environment)

"Are Payment for Environmental Services changing people's Values, beliefs and behavior? Evidence from a case in Colombia"

2:30 – 2:45

Gina Massell (Environment)

"Small Scale Anaerobic Digestion and Electrical Generation in Ghana"

Rebecca Bender (Environment)

"Engineering for Ecotourism in Costa Rica"

2:45 – 3:00

J. Robert Logan (Environment)

"The impacts of fog on arid lands: an international, interdisciplinary collaboration in the Namib Desert, Africa"

Mengmeng Zhang (Agriculture)

"The Evolution of Innovation Networks in the Chinese Seed Industry: The Impacts of Geography and Firm Size"

3:00 – 3:20

Lightning Round II (Room 105)

click here for abstracts

Shengpan Lin: "Phytoplankton biomass in U.S.A. lakes may increase by 88% by the end of the 21st century "

Samuel Smidt: "Why is groundwater depletion persistent in the High Plains Aquifer?"

Matthew Houser: "Who Framed Climate Change?: Identifying the How and Why of Iowa Corn Farmers' Framing of Climate Change"

3:20 - 3:30
Coffee Break (Auditorium)

3:30 – 4:30

Plenary #2: Dr. Bilal Butt (Auditorium)

"From Phenology to Poaching: International Environmental Research Collaborations in sub-Saharan Africa"

 

 

Theme for 2015 Event: International Research Collaboration - Addressing Environmental Challenges

Michigan State University’s Environmental Science and Policy Program requests that you Save the Date for this fall’s Research Symposium. This year’s theme focuses on collaborations between scholars across disciplines and across geographies working together to identify and address pressing environmental challenges. We propose this conference as a means to connect ideas and researchers from a myriad of backgrounds and regions. A holistic approach toward sustainability requires multiple perspectives, and this program intends to foster this interdisciplinary sharing. The symposium will explore opportunities and angles to better unite present and future academics in addressing the state of the environment.

Strengthened environmental decision making requires researchers who can critically integrate diverse perspectives and methodologies when conceptualizing, investigating, and addressing environmental challenges. Students from all departments are invited to present work at any stage in its development through oral presentations, poster presentations, and discussion groups. Please mark Oct. 23 on your calendar for the symposium and keep an eye open for our calls for abstracts and the opening of registration.

Plenary Speaker

Dr. Arup K. SenGupta, P.C. Rossin Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lehigh University

sengupta

Biosketch:
Dr. SenGupta’s research interests include preparation, characterization and innovative use of novel adsorbents; ion exchangers; reactive polymers; specialty membranes in environmental separation and development of sustainable environmental processes. He is a leader in environmental technology research and education, and has guided dozens of graduate students to successful careers in engineering practice and research. Dr. SenGupta’s award-winning research has expanded the field of ion exchange science and technology in solving critical environmental problems, and has led to the development of new classes of hybrid ion exchangers that have been incorporated into water and wastewater treatment processes globally. He heads an international, interdisciplinary effort to develop and promote a sustainable treatment system that provides drinking water free of arsenic to thousands of people all over the world. He developed and helped to commercialize the first polymer-based absorbent for arsenic in the U.S., a product that provides arsenic-safe water to well over one million people in both the developing and the developed waorld.  SenGupta currently has seven US patents.
Plenary title:
Technology Benefiting Humanity: Transforming Global Arsenic and Fluoride Crisis into an Economic Opportunity
Plenary abstract:
Although unknown nearly twenty five years ago, natural arsenic contamination of groundwater has emerged as a major global crisis affecting over fifty countries including the USA. The adverse effect of arsenic poisoning is more pronounced in countries in the south and southeast Asia. In a similar vein, the presence of excess fluoride in naturally contaminated ground water has been responsible for dental and skeletal fluorosis posing health hazard for nearly 300 million people in Africa and Asia. During the last fifteen years, we have invented, developed and commercialized nanotechnology based hybrid ion exchangers that are robust, reusable and exhibit high selectivity for arsenic and fluoride removal from contaminated ground waters around the world. Through inter-disciplinary approach and appropriate business model, we have succeeded in transforming major drinking water crises into an economic opportunity for impoverished communities while providing safe drinking water.

Keynote Speaker

Dr. DeAndra Beck, Associate Dean for Research, International Studies and Programs, Michigan State University

beck

Biosketch:

DeAndra Beck is Associate Dean for Research (International Studies and Programs) at Michigan State University. Before joining MSU, Dr. Beck served as a Program Director in the National Science Foundation's Office of International and Integrative Activities, with responsibility for NSF's Developing Country initiatives and the Middle East and Africa portfolios. She worked closely with the U.S. Agency for International Development to bridge the interests of science and development, including the design and implementation of the Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER Science) initiative. PEER Science provides merit-based funding to developing country scientists who are collaborating with NSF-funded scientists. Dr. Beck also co-managed Science Across Virtual Institutes (SAVI), a mechanism to foster global partnerships among NSF awardees, and she served on NSF's INSPIRE working group, which is piloting a new NSF initiative to solicit and fund transformative, multidisciplinary research. In cooperation with CRDF Global, she was instrumental in launching Newton's List as a platform to publicize funding opportunities for international research collaboration and initiated the International Funding Agency Seminar to facilitate dialogue among global science funding agencies. Prior to NSF, Dr. Beck served as the acting Managing Director for Environment and Social Assessment at the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). While at MCC, she participated in the negotiation of multi-million dollar Compacts with Ghana, Armenia, and Mongolia and managed a team of professional staff responsible for environment and social assessment issues across the full spectrum of MCC eligible countries. Previously, Dr. Beck served as Assistant Director for Policy, U.S. Forest Service International Programs, where she represented the interests of the U.S. forestry community in international negotiations, including the UN Forum on Forests, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Tropical Timber Organization, and the Montreal Process. These positions flanked her foray into the private sector as Chief Executive Officer of a biotechnology start-up company. Dr. Beck held positions as an international research administrator at the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and as an AAAS Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development. She earned a B.S. (cum laude) and Ph.D. in biochemistry from Texas A&M University.

Keynote Title:

Navigating the Funding Maze:  Strategies to Fund International Research Collaboration

Keynote Abstract:

Identifying funding opportunities to support the international research efforts of MSU faculty and graduate students can be challenging.  The funding landscape includes, but is not limited to, federal agencies, foundations, and international entities, as well as private sector interests.  Knowing the mission and mandate of each is essential to design an effective strategy for funding international research.  This presentation will provide an introduction to the international research funding landscape and will include tips, strategies, and resources for MSU faculty and students to consider.  There will be a particular focus on National Science Foundation (NSF) funding opportunities and MSU funding intelligence resources.

Plenary Speaker

Dr. Bilal Butt, Assistant Professor of Natural Resources and Environment, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan

bilal

Biosketch:
Bilal Butt is an assistant professor at the School of Natural Resources and Environment and a faculty affiliate of the African Studies Center. Bilal is a people-environment geographer with regional specialization in sub-Saharan Africa and technical expertise in geospatial technologies (GPS, GIS & Remote Sensing), ecological monitoring and social-scientific appraisals. His general research interests lie at the intersection of the natural and social sciences to answer questions of how people and wildlife are coping with, and adapting to changing climates, livelihoods and ecologies in arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa.  His current projects investigate: (1) the spatiality of livelihood strategies (resource access and utilization) among pastoral peoples under regimes of increasing climatic variability and uncertainty; (2) the nature of the relationships between wildlife and livestock in dry land pastoral ecosystems of East Africa; (3) violent and non-violent conflicts over natural resources, and; (4) how mobile information technologies such as cell phones influence natural resource management strategies among pastoral peoples in dry lands.
Plenary Title:
"From Phenology to Poaching: International Environmental Research Collaborations in sub-Saharan Africa"
Plenary Abstract:
Traditional models of international research collaborations, particularly those with a tight environmental focus, tend to emphasize large networks, borne out of collaborative proposals funded by NSF, NIH, and other funding agencies. Yet, it is logistically and structurally difficult for junior faculty to become involved in, let alone lead, these large collaborative efforts. While funding from major agencies is becoming more competitive, non-traditional research collaborations with smaller groups of scientists and limited budgets prevail, though with little attention. In this talk, I elaborate on the challenges for junior faculty in interdisciplinary and international environmental research collaborations through a self-reflection of four case studies from East and West Africa. I highlight how collaboration can successfully occur through spontaneous, and often-unexpected ways across continents and disciplines. I further discuss how collaborations benefit from grounded place-based fieldwork that engages with the lived realities of local peoples and complex environments, often in remote locations. I conclude the talk by providing some tangible advice for graduate students who will soon embark on postdoc and junior faculty positions.   


 

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS NOW CLOSED

The Environmental Science and Policy Program (ESPP) at Michigan State University thanks you for your submissions ESPP Research Symposium: International Research Collaborations - Addressing Environmental Challenges, to be held on October 23rd, 2015 at the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center. Top poster and oral presentations will receive first and second place awards of $500 and $300. Lightning round winners will receive $100.



This year's theme focuses on collaborations between scholars across disciplines and across geographies working together to identify and address pressing environmental challenges. We propose this conference as a means to connect ideas and researchers from a myriad of backgrounds and regions. A holistic approach toward sustainability requires multiple perspectives, and this program intends to foster this interdisciplinary sharing. The symposium will explore opportunities and angles to better unite present and future academics in addressing the state of the environment.

Strengthened environmental decision making requires researchers who can critically integrate diverse perspectives and methodologies when conceptualizing, investigating, and addressing environmental challenges. Students from all departments are invited to present work at any stage in its development through oral presentations, poster presentations, and discussion groups. Proposals may consider research collaborations in any environmental context, including but not limited to:
 

  • Climate mitigation, adaptation, and geoengineering
  • Water policy and management
  • Resource use and extraction
  • Agricultural cultivation, distribution, and consumption
  • Human and physical dimensions of wildlife policy and management
  • Social, political, psychological, and economic factors in risk perception and assessment
  • Challenges in the conceptualization and communication of environmental problems
 


Accepted proposals will be organized by shared themes but will strive to bring together unique perspectives on each phase in the development of a comprehensive research project.

Please direct any questions to espp@msu.edu.
 

2015 Planning Committee

Udita Sanga (Community Sustainability), Brad Peter (Geography), Oishi Sanyal (Engineering), John Keven (Natural Science)

 

Swackhamer

 


Agenda

Time Event Location

9:00am
9:05am

Introductory Remarks - Dr. Volodymyr Tarabara, ESPP Associate Director Kellogg Center, Conference

9:05am
9:50am

Keynote Speaker - Kellogg Center, Conference
9:50am
10:00am
Networking coffee break Kellogg Center, Conference
10:00am
11:00am

Student Presentations:

Kellogg Center, Conference
11:00am
12:00pm
Panel Discussion Kellogg Center, Conference
12:00pm
1:00pm
Professional Development Lunch for Graduate Students Kellogg Center,

1:00pm
3
:00pm

Student Presentations:

Student Presentations:

  • "A Water Sustainability Hazard for Michigan's Coastal Communities" by Zachary Curtis
  • "Stormwater Management Monitoring and Development on Michigan State's Campus" by Rebecca Bender
  • "Molecular Measurements from Sediments Cores in Lake St. Clair Linking Pollution and Watershed Management" by Yolanda Brooks
  • "Penotypic and Geotypic Diversity of Pseudomonas and Aeromonas of the Red Cedar River" by Karen Davidge
  • "The Speciation of Copper in Sediment and Water of Copper Mining-Impacted Lake: Role of Dissolved Organic Compounds for Controlling Copper Solubility of Lake" Chaiyanum Tangtong
  • "Phages Metagenome in Activated Sludge Samples" by Mariya Munir
  • "Human and Bovine Viruses and Bacteroides as Microbial Source Tracking Tools in Selected Great Lake Beaches" by Ziqiang Yin
  • "Chlorophyll Concentration Response to Zebra Mussel Invasion in the Great Lakes" by Shengpan Lin

Kellogg Center, Conference Room 104 A & B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kellogg Center, Room 106

3:00pm
3:15pm
Networking coffee break Kellogg Center, Conference Room 104 A & B
3:15pm
4:30pm

Student Presentations:

Kellogg Center, Conference Room 104 A & B and Room 106
4:30pm
5:15pm

Keynote Speech

Concluding Remarks and Student Awards- Dr. Jinhua Zhao, ESPP Director

Kellogg Center, Conference Room 104 A & B