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nexus

Climate-Food-Energy-Water Nexus

The Environmental Science and Policy Program is launching a symposium series to explore the challenges and opportunities we face in enhancing human well-being while protecting the environment. This symposium will bring distinguished thinkers from around the world to explore what we know, what we need to know and what we must do as we move into a century of unprecedented environmental change, technological advancement and scale of human activity.

The event will include research focused seminars and discussion but will emphasize events and presentations that will speak to the broader MSU and Michigan community. In addition to live events and webcasts, the Inaugural Symposium will generate educational materials that can be used in classes and non-traditional education in the spring and beyond.

This symposium is made possible through the generous endowment of Barbara Sawyer-Koch and Donald Koch.

 

Wednesday-Friday, April 6-8, 2016
Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
Michigan State University

POSTER ABSTRACTS NOW BEING ACCEPTED!

All students - high school through postdoctoral researchers - are invited to submit an abstract of a research poster. The posters will be judged during the Scientific Colloquium on April 7, and cash prizes award. Please go to this site to submit your abstract by March 15.

 

Agenda

Day 1: Public Symposium

Time Description
9:00am - 9:45 am

Continential breakfast and registration, Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

10:00 am - 10:45 am

Bruno Basso, MSU

Auditorum, Kellogg Center

11:00 am - 11:45 am

Kate Brauman, University of Minnesota

Auditorium, Kellogg Center

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Lunch, Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

1:00 pm - 1:45 pm

Ed McCormick, Water Environment Federation

Auditorium, Kellogg Center

2:00 pm - 2:45 pm

Tasso Azevedo, Rainforst Alliance

Auditorium, Kellogg Center

3:00 pm - 3:45 pm

Annette Huber-Lee, Stockholm Environmental Institute

Auditorium, Kellogg Center

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Keynote speech: Lynn Scarlett, The Nature Conservancy

Auditorium, Kellogg Center

 

Day 2: Scientific Colloquium

Time Description
9:00am - 9:45 am

Robert Richardson, MSU

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

9:45 am - 10:30 am

Gordon Holtgrieve, University of Washington

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

10:45 am - 11:30 am

Kathleen Halvorsen, Michigan Tech University; Rachel Shwom, Rutgers

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

11:30 am - 12:15 pm

Shashi Shekhar, University of Minnesota

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

12:15 pm - 2:00 pm

Lunch and Poster Judging

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

2:00 pm - 2:45 pm

Felicia Wu, Michigan State University

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

2:45 pm. - 3:30 pm

Cathy Kling, Iowa State University

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

3:30 pm - 4:15 pm

Patricia Sorrano, Michigan State University

Big Ten B, Kellogg Center

4:15 pm

Closing Reception and Poster Awards Ceremony

Red Cedar A, Kellogg Center

 

Special thank you to our steering committee: Dr. Thomas Dietz, Dr. R. Jan Stevenson, Dr. Julie Libarkin, and Dr. Phoebe Zarnetske. All your hard work has been appreciated.

Speakers

 

Lynn Scarlett

Lynn Scarlett
Managing Director for Public Policy, The Nature Conservancy

Former Deputy Secretary and Chief Operating Officer of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Lynn Scarlett is worldwide Managing Director for Public Policy at The Nature Conservancy. In this role, Scarlett directs all policy in the United States and the 35 countries in which TNC operates. Scarlett also served at Interior as the Acting Secretary of the Interior in 2006. While Interior’s Deputy Secretary, Scarlett initiated and chaired the Department’s Cooperative Conservation Working Group and its first-ever Climate Change Task Force. She established the Interior’s Ocean and Coastal Activities office to coordinate cross-departmental ocean and coastal work. She chaired the nation’s Wildland Fire Leadership Council. She served on the Executive Committee of the President’s Management Council. She is author or co-author of publications on climate change adaptation; ecosystem services; large landscape conservation; and science and decision making. She chairs the Science Advisory Board of NOAA, co-chairs the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives Council established in 2014 by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and co-chairs the National Academy of Sciences Sustainability Roundtable. She also served on the US Global Change Research Program Committee and is a co-convening lead author of the National Climate Assessment. She is on the Dean’s Advisory Council of the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara. She also serves on the boards of trustees of the National Wildlife Refuge Association and is a member of the Coordinating Council of the Practitioners’ Network for Large Landscape Conservation. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in political science from the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she also completed her Ph.D. coursework and exams in political science and political economy.

Geology of the Planet: Welcome to the Anthropocene. The Economist, May 2011.

The Anthropocene: A Man-made World. The Economist, May 2011.

Enter the Anthropocene: The Age of Man. Elizabeth Kolbert, National Geographic.

The National Academies of Science/Royal Society report "Climate Change: Evidence and Causes."

American Association for the Advancement of Science. "Climate Science: What We know."


 

Tasso Azevedo

Tasso Azevedo
Rainforest Alliance

Tasso Azevedo is a forestry and climate change consultant and social entrepreneur. He was the founder and director of the Brazilian NGO Imaflora (Institute of Forest and Agriculture Management and Certification), Director of the National Forest Program at the Ministry of Environment in Brazil, the Secretary General of National Forest Commission and the first Chief & Director General of the Brazilian Forest Service. Tasso was one of the key people involved in the design and implementation of Brazil’s National Plan to Combat Deforestation in the Amazon, resulting in a more than 75 percent decline in deforestation in the region, as well as the Amazon Fund and the identification of Brazil's targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Tasso graduated from the School of Agriculture at the University of São Paulo and also serves as a board member of Imazon, Imaflora, Planeta Sustentável and the REDD Task Force. He also teaches post-graduate programs at the Fundação Instituto de Administração, Fundação Getulio Vargas, Pontificia Universidade Católica, Fundação Don Cabral and UniEthos.

 


 

Kate Brauman

Kate Brauman
Lead Scientist, Global Water Initiative at the University of Minnesota


Kate Brauman is the Lead Scientist for the Global Water Initiative at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment. Kate’s research integrates hydrology and land use with economics and policy to better understand how water use by people affects the environment and our ability to live well in it. Through projects as diverse as payments for watershed services, global variation in “crop per drop”, and worldwide trends in water consumption and availability, Kate works with the Global Water Initiative to find sustainable solutions to pressing water issues. Kate received her doctorate from Stanford University and her undergraduate degree from Columbia University. Prior to her graduate studies, Kate worked in public education at the Natural Resources Defense Council and continues to speak and write about water for broad audiences.

 


 

Annette Huber-Lee

Annette Huber-Lee
Senior Scientist, Stockholm Environment Institute


Annette Huber-Lee is a senior scientist who focuses on water resource management and policy. She returned to SEI-US in May after serving as director of SEI Asia, in Bangkok, from mid-2012 until February 2013. She has more than 20 years of professional experience in international and domestic planning and management of environmental and water resources. Annette focuses on the integration of economic, engineering, and ecological approaches to solve environmental and social problems in a comprehensive and sustainable manner, as well as the development of innovative approaches to environmental policy and natural resource conflict management.

 


 

Bruno Basso

Bruno Basso
Professor of Geological Sciences, Michigan State University


Bruno Basso's research deals mainly with water, carbon, nitrogen cycling and modeling in agro-ecosystems, and spatial analysis of crop yield. Basso's modeling research has focused on extending soil-crop-atmosphere models to spatial domains at the field scale, and in particular on developing, testing, and deploying SALUS, a next-generation process-based model that integrates crop productivity with water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes in a spatially explicit manner. Through this research, it has been possible to integrate the effects of topography and soil properties on soil water balance, and thereby partition surface vs. subsurface flows in different landscape positions. This has important value for better understanding and predicting nitrogen conservation patterns in cropped landscapes as well as soil carbon change - and has led to important insights for the likely effects of climate change on carbon and water footprints of future cropping systems, as noted in recent publications.

 


 

Ed McCormick

Ed McCormick
Water Environment Federation


An expert in recovering valuable resources from wastewater, Ed McCormick is the 2014-2015 President of the Board of Trustees of the Water Environmental Federation, an international organization of water quality professions.

I've been thinking about the ideas around centralization in decisions that seek to ensure sustainability. Many framings of the question draw parallels between ecosystems and human systems. The debates on this topic can be surprisingly heated. Deeply held values are, often only implicitly, invoked. What do we understand about the interplay between efficiency and innovation, effectiveness and flexibility?

Lynch, A., Adler, C. E., & Howard, N. C. (2013). Policy diffusion in arid Basin water management: a Q method approach in the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia. Regional Environmental Change. doi: DOI 10.1007/s10113-014-0602-3

Orlove, B. (2005). Human adaptation to climate change: a review of three historical cases and some general perspectives. Environmental Science & Policy, 8, 589–600. doi: doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2005.06.009

 


 

Cathy Kling

Cathy Kling
Distinguished Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State Univerity


Cathy Kling, Charles F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Agriculture and Life Sciences and a professor of economics, has served as the director of CARD since July 2013, after having served many years as the division head of CARD's Resource and Environmental Policy Division. She received a bachelor's degree in business and economics from the University of Iowa and a doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland. In her work at CARD, Kling is undertaking research to examine how agricultural practices affect water quality, wildlife, soil carbon content, and greenhouse gases.

 


 

Felicia Wu

Felicia Wu
John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University


Dr. Felicia Wu is a graduate of Harvard University and most recently served as associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh. Wu has been a Distinguished Lecturer in the Toxicology Seminar Series in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. She is a Hannah Distinguished Professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a joint appointment in the Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics. Her research will focus on applying health economic and mathematical modeling techniques to understand the public health impacts of agricultural practices, both in the United States and worldwide.

 


 

Pat Sorrano

Patricia Sorrano
Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University


I am a landscape limnologist, that is, a freshwater scientist who studies the multi-scaled spatial and temporal drivers of aquatic chemistry and biology. I am also a macrosystems ecologist and I conduct research to develop concepts, approaches, and datasets needed to foster the development of data-intensive approaches in ecology. All of my research is collaborative. I am co-director, with Kendra Spence Cheruvelil, of the Landscape Limnology Research Group, in which several projects are ongoing. In addition, I am PI for the NSF-Macrosystems Biology project, CSI-Limnology.

 


 

Rachael Shwom

Rachael Shwom
Assistant Professor, Department of Human Ecology, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University


Rachael Shwom is a sociologist who is interested how different groups of people in society make sense of and respond to energy and climate change problems. She understand these processes as not just technological or economic processes, but inherently social and political processes. She is particularly focused on the role of civil society, such as environmental groups and the public in general and their role in perceiving and acting to remedy climate change. She has studied public opinion on climate change, non-profits decisions to partner with business to address energy issues, household energy consumption, long term risk governance, and risk communication. She uses both quantitative and qualitative methods to study these issues including surveys, social network analysis, and semi-structured interviews. She teaches undergraduate courses in Energy and Society, Innovative Solutions to Environmental Problems, and Environmental Politics and graduate courses in Human Dimensions of Environmental Change, Organizations in the Environmental Movement, and Long Term Risk Assessment and Governance. For more information see http://shwomrac.tumblr.com/

 


 

Kathleen Halvorsen

Kathleen Halvorsen
Professor of Natural Resource Policy, Social Sciences and School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technical University


As part of the Environmental and Energy Policy Graduate Program, I teach the Advanced Natural Resource Policy and Principles of Interdisciplinary Team Science which is an international class taught to MTU students and students at universities across the Americas.

I currently have two main research foci, both of which relate to mitigating climate change in an international context. One relates to the development of biofuels in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. This includes identification of impacts, barriers and opportunities related to this development. I view bioenergy as one important tool in our climate change mitigation toolbox. This work also links to public understandings of climate change causes and solutions.

I served on the 2010-11 National Academy of Science's Committee on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increasing Biofuels and you can download our report as a free pdfhere. I lead a group of about 100 scientists and students from Brazil, Mexico, Canada, Uruguay, Argentina, and the United States with a five year National Science Foundation Partnerships in International Research and Education (PIRE) grant to study the policy and socioecological dimensions of forest-related bioenergy development across the Americas.

My research projects and supervision of graduate students are very interdisciplinary. I have the pleasure of working with a wide variety of social, natural, and applied (engineering) scientists across Europe, China, and North and South America.

On a more personal level, I love to spend time hiking, snowshoeing, cross country skiing, spinning yarn, knitting, and spending time with my dogs.

 


 

Cathy Kling

Gordon Holtgrieve
Assistant Professor, Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington


Gordon Holtgrieve is an ecologist interested in understanding how terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems function and are connected. His work takes a whole-ecosystem perspective to consider how the physical, chemical, and biological properties of ecosystems interact to support the resources that society depends on. Gordon’s field research crosses diverse environments, from remote western North America to the southeast Asia as part of theMekong Basing Research Group. His techniques range from site-based analysis of field data to global-scale mathematical and statistical modeling. Gordon seeks to inform conservation and resource management through research, which is rooted in the belief that effective policies for sustainability are based on sound science.

I've been thinking about the ideas around centralization in decisions that seek to ensure sustainability. Many framings of the question draw parallels between ecosystems and human systems. The debates on this topic can be surprisingly heated. Deeply held values are, often only implicitly, invoked. What do we understand about the interplay between efficiency and innovation, effectiveness and flexibility?

Lynch, A., Adler, C. E., & Howard, N. C. (2013). Policy diffusion in arid Basin water management: a Q method approach in the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia. Regional Environmental Change. doi: DOI 10.1007/s10113-014-0602-3

Orlove, B. (2005). Human adaptation to climate change: a review of three historical cases and some general perspectives. Environmental Science & Policy, 8, 589–600. doi: doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2005.06.009


 

 

Shashi Shekar

Shashi Shekhar
McKnight Distinguished University Professor of Computer Science, University of Minnesota


Shashi Shekhar received the B. Tech degree in Computer Science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, in 1985, the M.S. degree in Business Administration and the Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, in 1989. He is a McKnight Distinguished University Professor the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. His research interests include spatial databases, spatial data mining, geographic and information systems (GIS), and intelligent transportation systems. He is a co-author of a textbook on Spatial Databases (Prentice Hall, 2003, isbn 0-13-017480-7), co-edited an Encyclopedia of GIS (Springer, 2008, isbn 978-0-387-30858-6) and has published over 260 research papers in peer-reviewed journals, books, and conferences, and workshops. He is serving as a co-Editor-in-Chief for Geo-Informatica: An International Journal on Advances in Computer Sc. for GIS , a series editor for the Springer Briefs in GIS, a general co-chair for Intl. Symposium on Spatial and Temporal Databases (2011) and a program co-chair for Intl. Conf. on Geographic Information Science (2012). He served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering as well as the IEEE-CS Computer Science & Engineering Practice Board. He also served as a program co-chair of the ACM Intl. Workshop on Advances in Geographic Information Systems, 1996. He is serving on the National Academies's Future Work-force for Geospatial Intelligence Committee (2011). He served as a member of the mapping science committee of the National Research Council National Academy of Sciences (2004-9), as well as the Board of Directors of University Consortium on GIS (2003-2004). Dr. Shekhar received the IEEE Technical Achievement Award (2006). He is a Fellow of the IEEE Computer Society, a Fellow of the American Association for Advancement to Science, as well as a member of the ACM.

I've been thinking about the ideas around centralization in decisions that seek to ensure sustainability. Many framings of the question draw parallels between ecosystems and human systems. The debates on this topic can be surprisingly heated. Deeply held values are, often only implicitly, invoked. What do we understand about the interplay between efficiency and innovation, effectiveness and flexibility?

Lynch, A., Adler, C. E., & Howard, N. C. (2013). Policy diffusion in arid Basin water management: a Q method approach in the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia. Regional Environmental Change. doi: DOI 10.1007/s10113-014-0602-3

Orlove, B. (2005). Human adaptation to climate change: a review of three historical cases and some general perspectives. Environmental Science & Policy, 8, 589–600. doi: doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2005.06.009


 

 

Robert Richardson

Robert Richardson
Associate Professor of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University


Robert Richardson is an ecological economist with interests in the study of environment and development, particularly the contribution of ecosystem services and natural resources to socioeconomic well-being. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from Colorado State University, and his teaching, research, and outreach program focuses primarily on sustainable development. Dr. Richardson uses a variety of methods from the behavioral and social sciences to study decision making related to the use of natural resources and the protection of ecosystem services. His research has included assessments of the role of natural resources in poverty alleviation and food security, agricultural-environmental linkages, vulnerability to climate change, and tradeoffs in decision making about environmental management. He has conducted research in southern and eastern Africa, Central America, and southeast Asia, in addition to several projects in the USA. 

Dr. Richardson is an affiliate faculty member with MSU‘s Environmental Science and Policy Program, Center for Advanced Study of International Development, Center for Regional Food Systems, African Studies Center, and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

I've been thinking about the ideas around centralization in decisions that seek to ensure sustainability. Many framings of the question draw parallels between ecosystems and human systems. The debates on this topic can be surprisingly heated. Deeply held values are, often only implicitly, invoked. What do we understand about the interplay between efficiency and innovation, effectiveness and flexibility?

Lynch, A., Adler, C. E., & Howard, N. C. (2013). Policy diffusion in arid Basin water management: a Q method approach in the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia. Regional Environmental Change. doi: DOI 10.1007/s10113-014-0602-3

Orlove, B. (2005). Human adaptation to climate change: a review of three historical cases and some general perspectives. Environmental Science & Policy, 8, 589–600. doi: doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2005.06.009